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Beautifying Breakfast

We’ve all heard that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. But did you know that it is also key for beautiful skin?

A breakfast with protein and healthy fats provides you with long lasting energy in the morning. At the same time you should avoid to eat sugar, fructose, refined grains and grains with a lot of gluten.

We recommend a portion of protein from the following ingredients :

For vegans

  • Nuts like walnuts, pine nuts and almonds
  • Vegan cheeses
  • Vegetable spreads
  • Legumes like lentils and chickpeas in small quantities
  • Quinoa
  • Avocado

For non-vegans

  • Eggs: organic or free range  (number 0 or 1)
  • Goat and sheep cheese (also cow cheese, if it’s a good quality, organic cheese and if you are not cow lactose intolerant)
  • Roquefort (it’s a great source of B12, especially if you don’t eat meat)
  • Ham from organic agricultures
  • Fermented milk like kefir and yogurt
  • Small fish such as sardines or anchovies
  • Organic butter

Combine it with a small piece of organic whole grain bread made from sour dough. Ancient grains such as spelt, kamut or rye have less gluten are easier to digest. You can also have a beverage without sugar – coffee, tea, vegetable milk (use stevia from the health food store or coconut sugar to sweeten)

You can also have a fresh fruit, but do avoid juices, especially fruit juices, in the morning.

A breakfast low in sugar and fructose, and with the right Omega 3 and 6 balance will provide your body with the optimal nutrients and a radiant skin.

Small steps to conscious living

The future of our planet is an important issue today.Although many people take our planet for granted, environmental and ethical consciousness is impulsing change. As consumers we should be aware that our daily actions impact not only ourselves but also many others as well as our future.

Here is a list compiled by the UN of little things you can do that will actually have an impact:

  • Turn off devices and unplug them
  • Carefully select the companies you buy from
  • Recycle
  • Compost food scraps
  • Eat less animal products
  • Take shorter showers
  • Donate
  • Use alternative modes of transportation
  • Stay informed

You can find more details here

ZERO PALM OIL

More than half of the products in the supermarket contain palm oil and maybe even your investment fund.

It is very hard to avoid palm oil today, as it is included in food, cosmetics, detergents and cleaning products. Even a conscious consumer almost can’t avoid using it, since there is only an obligation to declare palm oil on food products. In cosmetics and cleaning products palm oil is used in a modified way and therefore gets a new name such as Stearate SE or Cetearyl Alcohol. All LE PURE products are palm oil free and we support campaigns such as Zero Palmöl and are listed in their product database.

Below you can find a list of ingredients that contain or are likely to contain palm oils:

–  Vegetable Oil

–  Vegetable Fat

–  Sodium Laureth Sulfate (in almost everything that foams) ^

–  Sodium Lauryl Sulfate ^

–  Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS or NaDS) ^

–  Palm Kernel#

–  Palm Oil Kernel #

–  Palm Fruit Oil #

–  Palmate #

–  Palmitate #

–  Palmolein #

–  Glyceryl Stearate #

–  Stearic Acid #

–  Elaeis Guineensis #

–  Palmitic Acid #

–  Palm Stearine #

–  Palmitoyl oxostearamide #

–  Palmitoyl tetrapeptide3 #

–  Steareth 2 *

–  Steareth 20 *

–  Sodium Kernelate #

–  Sodium Palm Kernelate #

–  Sodium Lauryl Lactylate/Sulphate *

–  Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate ^

–  Hyrated Palm Glycerides #

–  Sodium Isostearoyl Lactylaye ^

–  Cetyl Palmitate #

–  Octyl Palmitate #

–  Cetyl Alcohol ^

–  Palmityl Alchohol #

# These ingredients are definitely palm oil or derived from palm oil.

* These ingredients are often derived from palm oil, but could be derived from other vegetable oils.

^ These ingredients are either derived from palm oil or coconut oil.

Are you investing in palm oil without knowing it?

A new report by the Friends of the Earth US (FoE) states that some of the US’ leading institutional investors, including pension funds, are potentially fuelling environmental and social harm by ploughing billions of dollars into the palm oil industry through opaque financial arrangements.

FoE and As You Sow have developed a new database where members of the public can search for the name of their fund to see what palm oil holdings, and the value of the assets, are in the portfolio.

 

LUDWIG BECK on Marienplatz

Leader in niche and organic skincare in Germany

We are excited that our LE PURE certified organic skincare line is now available at the prestigious LUDWIG BECK store in Munich. LUDWIG BECK is not only an extraordinary store, it can look back at a long and successful history.

It all started when young button maker and dress trimmer Ludwig Beck opened a workshop in 1861. Starting with only a few workers Ludwig Beck managed to expand his business steadily and even King Ludwig II of Bavaria was one of his customers. The company remained in the Beck family until 1938 when it was sold to Gustl Feldmeier who led LUDWIG BECK through the next decades. Gustl Feldmeier not only expanded the store he also created the famous flagship store on Marienplatz in Munich. The department store is located in the heart of Munich and has become an indispensable part of the cityscape of Munich.

LUDWIG BECK in 1861

LUDWIG BECK in 1861

Nowadays LUDWIG BECK is famous for offering a unique shopping experience that satisfies all wishes of their customers. The flagship store is therefore called “Store of the Senses”. Furthermore the store’s originality and creativity has made into one of the most influential and trendsetting stores in Germany.

LUDWIG BECK

Besides offering well known luxury products, clients can also find niche products, which makes LUDWIG BECK one of the leaders in niche organic skincare. We are very proud to be a part of this success story.

The LE PURE organic skincare line is available at Marienplatz as well as at the LUDWIG BECK Beauty Fünf Höfe store and the LUDWIG BECK online store.

Cortana presents LE PURE Skincare

CORTANA-LOGO

Cortana presents LE PURE Skincare

Last Thursday Cortana, LE PURE Skincare and Qikobido organized a cocktail in Cortana’s store in Barcelona. Clients and members of the press were able to talk to designer Rosa Esteva about her new collection, try LE PURE’s organic skincare line and watch Mariona Aupí’s hand during a live session of Kobido, the ancient Japanese facial massage.

The creators of LE PURE, Julia Atzesberger and Marie Carrasquedo held a speech about the inspiration for their skincare line and what makes it a unique alternative in the market. The evening’s happenings were immortalized thanks to photographer Isabella Antonelli and Anna de Codorníu was the delicious cava of the evening.

Neroli PB

Neroli Essential Oil – the Bitter Orange Flower

In all our products we use the essential oil Neroli, which is obtained from the flower of the bitter orange tree. It is one of the most expensive essential oils on the market and has a very delicate perfume, which helps to calm the nervous system. In combination with the essential oil of roses, these two luxury ingredients determine the delicate scent of all our LE PURE products. When you apply our products, close your eyes for a second and transport yourself to a place like the Alhambra in Spain, where you walk among orange trees and get seduced by their sweet perfume that lingers in the warm wind.

 

The Cactus

A cactus is a member of the plant family Cactaceae within the order Caryophyllales. The word “cactus” derives, through Latin, from the Ancient Greek κάκτος (kaktos), a name originally used for a spiny plant whose identity is not certain. Prickly pears typically grow with flat, rounded cladodes (also called platyclades) armed with two kinds of spines; large, smooth, fixed spines and small, hairlike prickles called glochids, that easily penetrate skin and detach from the plant. Many types of prickly pears grow into dense, tangled structures. Cacti are native to the Americas, ranging from Patagonia in the south to parts of western Canada in the north—except for Rhipsalis baccifera, which also grows in Africa and Sri Lanka.

According to Wikipedia, when Carl Linnaeus published Species Plantarum in 1753 – the starting point for modern botanical nomenclature – he placed all the species of cactus known to him in one genus, Cactus. In 1754, the Scottish botanist Philip Miller divided cacti into several genera, including Opuntia. He distinguished the genus largely on the form of its flowers and fruits.